Debunking Myths About Domestic Violence

There are many myths and misconceptions about domestic violence. We shared many of them this month on Facebook. In case you missed any of them, we’ve compiled them here. Of course, this is not an all-inclusive list, but many of the most popular ones.

Myth: Abuse takes place because of drugs and alcohol Substance abuse does not cause domestic violence. While alcohol and domestic violence are frequently paired, it is never the sole reason behind it. It may increase the level of violence or it may be used as an excuse for the violence, but it is not the cause. Learn more here.

Myth: Abused victims can just leave Leaving is more complicated than it seems. There are many factors that prevent victims from leaving. Reasons may include financial restrictions, children, pets, social pressures or religious beliefs. Aside from danger, you can find a list of many reasons why people stay in abusive relationships here.

Myth: Domestic violence only happens among poor, minorities or in rural areas. Domestic violence does not recognize class or race. It happens throughout all levels of society, income and geographic locations. Stats don't really show the true prevalence of domestic violence among middle and upper class. Such women often stay quiet out of social concerns or have the means to stay in a hotel, not needing shelter services, from which statistics are often derived. Learn more here.

Myth: Domestic violence only affects women According to the National Domestic Violence Hotline, more than 1 in 4 men (28.5%) in the United States have experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetime. Learn more here.

Myth: Domestic violence is only physical Abuse is not only physical but can be verbal or emotional too. Abuse can be controlling leaving victims fearful and without liberties. Abusers may also make threats against personal property and pets. Learn some of the signs of non-physical abuse here.

Myth: Domestic violence is a private matter We have a community responsibility to help one another. If you or someone you know needs help, please call Alternatives to Violence at (970) 669-5150.

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